Wedding Dress Styles Explained

Now, I certainly don't profess myself to be a dress expert... However, here is a simple diagram of the different wedding dress shapes.

Ball Gown: The true “princess” dress. The ball gown has a fitted bodice and a full skirt. Ideal for most body types, but can be overwhelming on petites with very small frames.  

 

Mermaid: Sleek and sexy. Fitted on the body from the chest to the knee, then flares out close to the knee. Ideal for brides looking to show off their curves.

 

Sheath/Column: A narrow shape that flows straight down from the neckline to the hem. Ideal for lean frames, and athletic body types. Also great for hourglasses who are looking to flaunt their curves!


A-Line: Slightly more flowy than a ball gown, A-lines have fitted bodices through the waist and cascade out towards the ground, resembling the outline of an uppercase "A." Ideal for all body types.

 

Modified A-Line Dress:  Fitted on the bodice and hips and gradually flares to the hem, forming an “A” shape. The skirt of a modified A-line dress fits closer to the body than a traditional A-line.

 

Tea Length Wedding Dresses: Tea length wedding dresses often give brides a vintage style and feature a skirt that falls below the knee and above the ankle. Tea length dresses come in a variety of fabrics and necklines and can be dressed up or down to fit any type of wedding style.

Trumpet/Fit-and-Flare: Literally "fit-and-flare:" fitted through the body and flairs out mid-thigh. This cut is between a modified a-line and a mermaid cut. Ideal for brides looking to accentuate a small waist. Think: hourglass figures and petites. 

Trumpet / Fit-and-Flare: Literally "fit-and-flare:" fitted through the body and flairs out mid-thigh. This cut is between a modified a-line and a mermaid cut. Ideal for brides looking to accentuate a small waist. Think: hourglass figures and petites.